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wheeler brothers

Wheeler Brothers – “Straight and Steady”


Pairs Well With…Dawes, The Avett Brothers, The David Mayfield Parade


This is the third year running for Austin’s Wheeler Brothers taking on SXSW, but there’s something fresh about their latest LP Gold Boot Glitters that makes this year one of note. In short, Wheeler Brothers fit right in with the folk rock champions of the Americana revival the last few years. While these songs draw from deep roots and traditions, the clean and precise production on the record makes them stand out as great pop tunes as well. That tightness, a counterpoint to the rambling nature of bands like the Avetts or Old Crow, allows Wheeler Brothers to capture some rock energy on top of that old-timey base.

SXSW 2014 Spreadsheet 124

Countdown to SXSW Music: 7 days.  Highlights:

Chromeo (9) - For the veteran electro-funk duo (She’s In Control is a decade old now), the time is ripe for their disco and R&B-infused electronic funk.  The lead singles from the album, due this May, are sparkling slices of pop and are set to draw even more fans to their established sound.
Wheeler Brothers (7) - In short, Wheeler Brothers fit right in with the folk rock champions of the Americana revival the last few years.  While these songs draw from deep roots and traditions, the clean and precise production on the record makes them stand out as great pop tunes as well.
Wild Cub (7) - The marquee single for Wild Cub this year and last is “Thunder Clatter”, an excellently dense effort that works on pretty much all levels.  The jangled guitar lines, muffled organic and electronic percussion and open-arm vocal melodies – all pitched right down the middle.
Whiskey Folk Ramblers (6) – Luckily, Whiskey Folk Ramblers take care of their key descriptors right there in the their band name.  It’s authentic and soulful, best shown on 2013’s Western-influenced The Lonesome Underground.
Wick-it The Instigator (6) –  Wick-it, a producer and remix artist, has a nice way of enhancing tracks melodically rather than just finding a place to throw in a dance beat.  His diverse Soundcloud is worth a lengthy visit the hear Wick-it’s inventive flips from Timberlake and Jay-Z to a wild filter of Johnny Cash in a relatively tasteful recreation.
The Wild Feathers (6) – The Wild Feathers are a continuously solid folk rock band, making their 3rd consecutive trip to SXSW towing along their pop-Americana roots.  The band’s self-titled debut is slickly produced, mixing in Southern rock tendencies with twists of accessible pop-rock.
Wildflowers (6) – Wildflowers’ best attribute are those full harmonies, overlaid over a mix of bluegrass-rooted country and pop-rock themes.  It’s a wide range, but Wildflowers come across as forthright in either genre, singing and playing with purpose, energy and precision.
The Wet Secrets (5) – The Wet Secrets’ have shared a lone track, the bright, indie rock anthem “Sunshine”.  The Canadian band lives under a light layer of haze, smartly understating the sharp beams of pop hooks.  Update: The Wet Secrets released a full-length on their Bandcamp page – check out the rollicking Free Candy.
Whiskey Myers (5) – Whiskey Myers falls in a place between pop country and Southern rock, a polished mix highlighted by ripping guitar solos and red-dirt grit.  Their latest is Early Morning Shakes, a solid collection of accessible country to counterbalance the sugary nature of modern country radio.

SXSW 2014 Spreadsheet 124


Countdown to SXSW Music: 7 days. Highlights:


Chromeo (9) - For the veteran electro-funk duo (She’s In Control is a decade old now), the time is ripe for their disco and R&B-infused electronic funk. The lead singles from the album, due this May, are sparkling slices of pop and are set to draw even more fans to their established sound.

Wheeler Brothers (7) - In short, Wheeler Brothers fit right in with the folk rock champions of the Americana revival the last few years. While these songs draw from deep roots and traditions, the clean and precise production on the record makes them stand out as great pop tunes as well.

Wild Cub (7) - The marquee single for Wild Cub this year and last is “Thunder Clatter”, an excellently dense effort that works on pretty much all levels. The jangled guitar lines, muffled organic and electronic percussion and open-arm vocal melodies – all pitched right down the middle.

Whiskey Folk Ramblers (6) – Luckily, Whiskey Folk Ramblers take care of their key descriptors right there in the their band name. It’s authentic and soulful, best shown on 2013’s Western-influenced The Lonesome Underground.

Wick-it The Instigator (6) – Wick-it, a producer and remix artist, has a nice way of enhancing tracks melodically rather than just finding a place to throw in a dance beat. His diverse Soundcloud is worth a lengthy visit the hear Wick-it’s inventive flips from Timberlake and Jay-Z to a wild filter of Johnny Cash in a relatively tasteful recreation.

The Wild Feathers (6) – The Wild Feathers are a continuously solid folk rock band, making their 3rd consecutive trip to SXSW towing along their pop-Americana roots. The band’s self-titled debut is slickly produced, mixing in Southern rock tendencies with twists of accessible pop-rock.

Wildflowers (6) – Wildflowers’ best attribute are those full harmonies, overlaid over a mix of bluegrass-rooted country and pop-rock themes. It’s a wide range, but Wildflowers come across as forthright in either genre, singing and playing with purpose, energy and precision.

The Wet Secrets (5) – The Wet Secrets’ have shared a lone track, the bright, indie rock anthem “Sunshine”. The Canadian band lives under a light layer of haze, smartly understating the sharp beams of pop hooks. Update: The Wet Secrets released a full-length on their Bandcamp page – check out the rollicking Free Candy.

Whiskey Myers (5) – Whiskey Myers falls in a place between pop country and Southern rock, a polished mix highlighted by ripping guitar solos and red-dirt grit. Their latest is Early Morning Shakes, a solid collection of accessible country to counterbalance the sugary nature of modern country radio.

SXSW 2013 Spreadsheet 56:

Both new acts and returning OEB favorites make up this latest set, with eight bands scoring a “5” or above.  Highlights:

The Whigs (10) - Songs like “Gospel” and “Waiting” exhibit a tied-in rhythm section that is often overlooked with bands focusing on instrumental dynamics so much these last couple of years.
Wildcat! Wildcat! (9) - This isn’t quite radio-friendly material, rather Wildcat! Wildcat! focuses on inventive melodies and diversions with an experimental eye towards songwriting.
Whitehorse (8) - The vocal back-and-forth they display on tracks like “Mismatched Eyes” and “Achilles’ Desire” is enchanting, an interplay that continues musically throughout the bluesy record.
Wild Child (8) - On the opposite side, Wild Child has a, well, wild side to them.  “The Tale of You & Me” builds into a rambunctious sing-a-long, like Edward Sharpe for a woodsier crowd.
Wheeler Brothers (6) – Austin’s Wheeler Brothers are a passionate outfit, which is displayed through raucous acoustic strums and soul-searching vocals on their 2011 LP.  Their strongest track is the laid back “Portraits”, which sounds to be an updated take on “Friend of the Devil”.
The Wellspring (5) – Indie folk pop duo The Wellspring have ‘mainstream’ written all over them, so look for some breakout potential at SXSW.  The band aims for sugary melodies with a soft rock edge, but there’s tenderness to their songwriting and vocals that warrants a mention.
Wet Nuns (5) – Musically, I’m really digging on Wet Nuns’ heavy, pounding blues-rock riffs.  Their vocalist knowingly screams through his lyrics, which surprisingly doesn’t really mesh well with the loose grooves of the band.
White Violet (5) - Athens, Georgia indie rock band White Violet sounds like a gritty, dark version of Wilco on their latest record Hiding, Mingling.  Most of the tracks hit at most a mid-tempo beat, creating a sadness that resides over the whole album.

SXSW 2013 Spreadsheet 56:


Both new acts and returning OEB favorites make up this latest set, with eight bands scoring a “5” or above.  Highlights:


The Whigs (10) - Songs like “Gospel” and “Waiting” exhibit a tied-in rhythm section that is often overlooked with bands focusing on instrumental dynamics so much these last couple of years.

Wildcat! Wildcat! (9) - This isn’t quite radio-friendly material, rather Wildcat! Wildcat! focuses on inventive melodies and diversions with an experimental eye towards songwriting.

Whitehorse (8) - The vocal back-and-forth they display on tracks like “Mismatched Eyes” and “Achilles’ Desire” is enchanting, an interplay that continues musically throughout the bluesy record.

Wild Child (8) - On the opposite side, Wild Child has a, well, wild side to them.  “The Tale of You & Me” builds into a rambunctious sing-a-long, like Edward Sharpe for a woodsier crowd.

Wheeler Brothers (6) – Austin’s Wheeler Brothers are a passionate outfit, which is displayed through raucous acoustic strums and soul-searching vocals on their 2011 LP.  Their strongest track is the laid back “Portraits”, which sounds to be an updated take on “Friend of the Devil”.

The Wellspring (5) – Indie folk pop duo The Wellspring have ‘mainstream’ written all over them, so look for some breakout potential at SXSW.  The band aims for sugary melodies with a soft rock edge, but there’s tenderness to their songwriting and vocals that warrants a mention.

Wet Nuns (5) – Musically, I’m really digging on Wet Nuns’ heavy, pounding blues-rock riffs.  Their vocalist knowingly screams through his lyrics, which surprisingly doesn’t really mesh well with the loose grooves of the band.

White Violet (5) - Athens, Georgia indie rock band White Violet sounds like a gritty, dark version of Wilco on their latest record Hiding, Mingling.  Most of the tracks hit at most a mid-tempo beat, creating a sadness that resides over the whole album.

SXSW 2012 Spreadsheet 43:

The ladies rule the roost in this wonderful set featuring a record six bands ranked at a “7” or above.  Here are the highlights, Kevin’s last before the big band announcement expected sometime next week.  Highlights:

Whitehorse (8): Being a couple in life translates well to their music.  There’s an endearing quality to watching these established artists interact playfully both in lyric and performance.
Grace Woodroofe (8): Most of her songs move along at a crawling pace, almost like a spaced out Norah Jones. 
Wussy (8): Wussy jumps into all sorts of directions throughout their rich catalog, but there is a distinct sound that remains their own throughout. 
Young Galaxy (8): Like dance remixes of Florence and the Machine tracks, Young Galaxy combines vocal drama and danceable beats to some really engaging results.
Carolyn Wonderland (7): Wonderland’s territory is the blues, playing with the pop side of the genre in a timeless fashion.
Zeus (7): Driven by shiny piano melodies and 60’s British rock, Zeus definitely had Beatles records in rotation when defining their own sound.
Wheeler Brothers (6): This band of folksters from Austin deliver a pleasant sound, as if the boys in Wilco had grown up listening to emo-tinged rock from the early 00’s.
Workout (5): This ultra-catchy band from Brooklyn goes for broke with power pop song structures driven by bouncy piano runs and ripping guitar licks.

SXSW 2012 Spreadsheet 43:


The ladies rule the roost in this wonderful set featuring a record six bands ranked at a “7” or above.  Here are the highlights, Kevin’s last before the big band announcement expected sometime next week.  Highlights:


Whitehorse (8): Being a couple in life translates well to their music.  There’s an endearing quality to watching these established artists interact playfully both in lyric and performance.

Grace Woodroofe (8): Most of her songs move along at a crawling pace, almost like a spaced out Norah Jones. 

Wussy (8): Wussy jumps into all sorts of directions throughout their rich catalog, but there is a distinct sound that remains their own throughout. 

Young Galaxy (8): Like dance remixes of Florence and the Machine tracks, Young Galaxy combines vocal drama and danceable beats to some really engaging results.

Carolyn Wonderland (7): Wonderland’s territory is the blues, playing with the pop side of the genre in a timeless fashion.

Zeus (7): Driven by shiny piano melodies and 60’s British rock, Zeus definitely had Beatles records in rotation when defining their own sound.

Wheeler Brothers (6): This band of folksters from Austin deliver a pleasant sound, as if the boys in Wilco had grown up listening to emo-tinged rock from the early 00’s.

Workout (5): This ultra-catchy band from Brooklyn goes for broke with power pop song structures driven by bouncy piano runs and ripping guitar licks.