Operation Every Band

SXSW 2013 Spreadsheet 56:

Both new acts and returning OEB favorites make up this latest set, with eight bands scoring a “5” or above.  Highlights:

The Whigs (10) - Songs like “Gospel” and “Waiting” exhibit a tied-in rhythm section that is often overlooked with bands focusing on instrumental dynamics so much these last couple of years.
Wildcat! Wildcat! (9) - This isn’t quite radio-friendly material, rather Wildcat! Wildcat! focuses on inventive melodies and diversions with an experimental eye towards songwriting.
Whitehorse (8) - The vocal back-and-forth they display on tracks like “Mismatched Eyes” and “Achilles’ Desire” is enchanting, an interplay that continues musically throughout the bluesy record.
Wild Child (8) - On the opposite side, Wild Child has a, well, wild side to them.  “The Tale of You & Me” builds into a rambunctious sing-a-long, like Edward Sharpe for a woodsier crowd.
Wheeler Brothers (6) – Austin’s Wheeler Brothers are a passionate outfit, which is displayed through raucous acoustic strums and soul-searching vocals on their 2011 LP.  Their strongest track is the laid back “Portraits”, which sounds to be an updated take on “Friend of the Devil”.
The Wellspring (5) – Indie folk pop duo The Wellspring have ‘mainstream’ written all over them, so look for some breakout potential at SXSW.  The band aims for sugary melodies with a soft rock edge, but there’s tenderness to their songwriting and vocals that warrants a mention.
Wet Nuns (5) – Musically, I’m really digging on Wet Nuns’ heavy, pounding blues-rock riffs.  Their vocalist knowingly screams through his lyrics, which surprisingly doesn’t really mesh well with the loose grooves of the band.
White Violet (5) - Athens, Georgia indie rock band White Violet sounds like a gritty, dark version of Wilco on their latest record Hiding, Mingling.  Most of the tracks hit at most a mid-tempo beat, creating a sadness that resides over the whole album.

SXSW 2013 Spreadsheet 56:


Both new acts and returning OEB favorites make up this latest set, with eight bands scoring a “5” or above.  Highlights:


The Whigs (10) - Songs like “Gospel” and “Waiting” exhibit a tied-in rhythm section that is often overlooked with bands focusing on instrumental dynamics so much these last couple of years.

Wildcat! Wildcat! (9) - This isn’t quite radio-friendly material, rather Wildcat! Wildcat! focuses on inventive melodies and diversions with an experimental eye towards songwriting.

Whitehorse (8) - The vocal back-and-forth they display on tracks like “Mismatched Eyes” and “Achilles’ Desire” is enchanting, an interplay that continues musically throughout the bluesy record.

Wild Child (8) - On the opposite side, Wild Child has a, well, wild side to them.  “The Tale of You & Me” builds into a rambunctious sing-a-long, like Edward Sharpe for a woodsier crowd.

Wheeler Brothers (6) – Austin’s Wheeler Brothers are a passionate outfit, which is displayed through raucous acoustic strums and soul-searching vocals on their 2011 LP.  Their strongest track is the laid back “Portraits”, which sounds to be an updated take on “Friend of the Devil”.

The Wellspring (5) – Indie folk pop duo The Wellspring have ‘mainstream’ written all over them, so look for some breakout potential at SXSW.  The band aims for sugary melodies with a soft rock edge, but there’s tenderness to their songwriting and vocals that warrants a mention.

Wet Nuns (5) – Musically, I’m really digging on Wet Nuns’ heavy, pounding blues-rock riffs.  Their vocalist knowingly screams through his lyrics, which surprisingly doesn’t really mesh well with the loose grooves of the band.

White Violet (5) - Athens, Georgia indie rock band White Violet sounds like a gritty, dark version of Wilco on their latest record Hiding, Mingling.  Most of the tracks hit at most a mid-tempo beat, creating a sadness that resides over the whole album.

SXSW 2012 Spreadsheet 116:

An incredibly solid set for this late in the game anchors our morning coverage.  Highlights:

Wild Child (8): On the opposite side, Wild Child has a, well, wild side to them.  “The Tale of You & Me” builds into a rambunctious sing-a-long, like Edward Sharpe for a woodsier crowd.
William Elliott Whitmore (8): Like a minimal folk version of Bruce Springsteen, there’s a distinctive growl in Whitmore’s voice that carries a strong emotional weight, like he’s about to crack purely from heartbreak at any moment.
Willy Mason (7): His baritone vocals lines carry a weight of sadness, using traditional country and blues music as a backbone for Mason’s free wheeling stories.
White Violet (6): White Violet is the moniker of Nate Nelson, an Athens, GA native with a folk-based indie rock sounds, kind of sounds like a young Bright Eyes (that’s a good thing). 
The Wild Feathers (6): Falling somewhere between The Black Keys and The Black Crowes, The Wild Feathers have a jamming, gritty blues rock vibe.
Wild Moccasins (6): Though they bring an experimental twist, Wild Moccasins achieve a pretty big sound with dramatic pop and impassioned guy/girl vocals.
WIM (6): Like Midlake mixed with a little In Rainbows-era Radiohead, Australian band WIM has a flair for the dark and dramatic, but use a hypnotic mid-tempo pace instead of a traditional, driving rock approach.
Winterpills (6): With sweeping strings and dramatic percussion, Winterpills is right up the alley for anyone seeking chamber folk pop at SXSW.  Instead of building into dramatic anthems, Winterpills has a soft touch with their elegant and dense acoustic sound.
Widowspeak (5): Widowspeak is a dark rock band, combining slow and grungy alternative rock with a bluesy, alt country slant.
The Wilderness of Manitoba (5): Big harmonies and cutesy indie folk define The Wilderness of Manitoba, like a pop-oriented Fleet Foxes.
Will Sexton (5): Sexton is an Austin singer-songwriter featuring a nice storytelling approach to his accessible and light alt country sound.
Wintersleep (5): I’m not sure if there is such a thing as upbeat shoegaze, but Wintersleep fits that bill with their dreamy, psych pop sound.

SXSW 2012 Spreadsheet 116:


An incredibly solid set for this late in the game anchors our morning coverage.  Highlights:


Wild Child (8): On the opposite side, Wild Child has a, well, wild side to them.  “The Tale of You & Me” builds into a rambunctious sing-a-long, like Edward Sharpe for a woodsier crowd.

William Elliott Whitmore (8): Like a minimal folk version of Bruce Springsteen, there’s a distinctive growl in Whitmore’s voice that carries a strong emotional weight, like he’s about to crack purely from heartbreak at any moment.

Willy Mason (7): His baritone vocals lines carry a weight of sadness, using traditional country and blues music as a backbone for Mason’s free wheeling stories.

White Violet (6): White Violet is the moniker of Nate Nelson, an Athens, GA native with a folk-based indie rock sounds, kind of sounds like a young Bright Eyes (that’s a good thing). 

The Wild Feathers (6): Falling somewhere between The Black Keys and The Black Crowes, The Wild Feathers have a jamming, gritty blues rock vibe.

Wild Moccasins (6): Though they bring an experimental twist, Wild Moccasins achieve a pretty big sound with dramatic pop and impassioned guy/girl vocals.

WIM (6): Like Midlake mixed with a little In Rainbows-era Radiohead, Australian band WIM has a flair for the dark and dramatic, but use a hypnotic mid-tempo pace instead of a traditional, driving rock approach.

Winterpills (6): With sweeping strings and dramatic percussion, Winterpills is right up the alley for anyone seeking chamber folk pop at SXSW.  Instead of building into dramatic anthems, Winterpills has a soft touch with their elegant and dense acoustic sound.

Widowspeak (5): Widowspeak is a dark rock band, combining slow and grungy alternative rock with a bluesy, alt country slant.

The Wilderness of Manitoba (5): Big harmonies and cutesy indie folk define The Wilderness of Manitoba, like a pop-oriented Fleet Foxes.

Will Sexton (5): Sexton is an Austin singer-songwriter featuring a nice storytelling approach to his accessible and light alt country sound.

Wintersleep (5): I’m not sure if there is such a thing as upbeat shoegaze, but Wintersleep fits that bill with their dreamy, psych pop sound.