Operation Every Band

SXSW 2014 Spreadsheet 14

An evening set rears its head at OEB today as I close out the first round of artists.  We start back at “A” tomorrow, but this one is no slouch and brilliantly features three bands that start in ‘wild’!  Highlights:

Wild Child (8) - The growth on this record is telling.  An added sense of drama suits Wild Child quite well.  The tenderness is elevated as well, a combination that should spell for an engrossing set in Austin next year.   
Wild Ones (8) - An emotionally driven record, Wild Ones explore all sorts of corners of the pop universe, from the pulsing groove of “Curse Over Me” to plaintive delivery of album closer “Keep It Safe”.
Gabby Young and Other Animals (8) - While my 2011 SXSW review of Gabby Young and Other Animals focused on the softer side of the eclectic, world pop eight-piece, it’s the bombastic, gypsy approach of 2012’s The Band Called Out for More that has me turning my head towards this exciting sound.
Wild Moccasins (6) - Houston’s Wild Moccasins should have some new music on the horizon for SXSW 2014, hopefully continuing in the tradition of 2012’s Gag Reflections dense pop mentality.  The combination of surf grooves and psych-rock elements is a nice touch for this ever-promising outfit.
Dot Wiggin Band (5) – After a little 44-year break (!), Dot Wiggin, the lead singer of The Shaggs, returned with Ready! Get! Go! this year with a throwback sound picking up right where the eclectic Shaggs left off many moons ago. 

SXSW 2014 Spreadsheet 14


An evening set rears its head at OEB today as I close out the first round of artists.  We start back at “A” tomorrow, but this one is no slouch and brilliantly features three bands that start in ‘wild’!  Highlights:


Wild Child (8) - The growth on this record is telling.  An added sense of drama suits Wild Child quite well.  The tenderness is elevated as well, a combination that should spell for an engrossing set in Austin next year.   

Wild Ones (8) - An emotionally driven record, Wild Ones explore all sorts of corners of the pop universe, from the pulsing groove of “Curse Over Me” to plaintive delivery of album closer “Keep It Safe”.

Gabby Young and Other Animals (8) - While my 2011 SXSW review of Gabby Young and Other Animals focused on the softer side of the eclectic, world pop eight-piece, it’s the bombastic, gypsy approach of 2012’s The Band Called Out for More that has me turning my head towards this exciting sound.

Wild Moccasins (6) - Houston’s Wild Moccasins should have some new music on the horizon for SXSW 2014, hopefully continuing in the tradition of 2012’s Gag Reflections dense pop mentality.  The combination of surf grooves and psych-rock elements is a nice touch for this ever-promising outfit.

Dot Wiggin Band (5) – After a little 44-year break (!), Dot Wiggin, the lead singer of The Shaggs, returned with Ready! Get! Go! this year with a throwback sound picking up right where the eclectic Shaggs left off many moons ago. 

Wild Child – “Pillow Talk”

 

Pairs Well With…She & Him, The Lumineers, The Head and the Heart

 

This November, Wild Child entered the studio to record their second record with none other than Ben Kweller.  The Texas-based singer-songwriter is a great match for Wild Child’s tender folk ballads and catchy folk-pop numbers.  After Blues on the Green and ACL appearances in 2012, don’t be surprised if this year’s SXSW finds the perfect storm of local fans and national journalists to launch Wild Child to the next level.

2012 Review: Wild Child is a young indie folk outfit from Austin with a surprisingly strong sound with only one album under their belts.  There are two distinct sides to this band.  On one hand, Wild Child has a tender quality, best displayed on the sentimental title track.  Vocalists Kelsey Wilson and Alexander Beggins display some beautiful trade-offs and harmonies throughout the track, reminiscent of The Head and the Heart’s slower material.  On the opposite side, Wild Child has a, well, wild side to them.  “The Tale of You & Me” builds into a rambunctious sing-a-long, like Edward Sharpe for a woodsier crowd.  Wild Child should kill it on their home turf, so check them out at Beale Street Tavern on Tuesday with OEB highlights Ruby Jane and Kopecky Family Band.

SXSW 2013 Spreadsheet 56:

Both new acts and returning OEB favorites make up this latest set, with eight bands scoring a “5” or above.  Highlights:

The Whigs (10) - Songs like “Gospel” and “Waiting” exhibit a tied-in rhythm section that is often overlooked with bands focusing on instrumental dynamics so much these last couple of years.
Wildcat! Wildcat! (9) - This isn’t quite radio-friendly material, rather Wildcat! Wildcat! focuses on inventive melodies and diversions with an experimental eye towards songwriting.
Whitehorse (8) - The vocal back-and-forth they display on tracks like “Mismatched Eyes” and “Achilles’ Desire” is enchanting, an interplay that continues musically throughout the bluesy record.
Wild Child (8) - On the opposite side, Wild Child has a, well, wild side to them.  “The Tale of You & Me” builds into a rambunctious sing-a-long, like Edward Sharpe for a woodsier crowd.
Wheeler Brothers (6) – Austin’s Wheeler Brothers are a passionate outfit, which is displayed through raucous acoustic strums and soul-searching vocals on their 2011 LP.  Their strongest track is the laid back “Portraits”, which sounds to be an updated take on “Friend of the Devil”.
The Wellspring (5) – Indie folk pop duo The Wellspring have ‘mainstream’ written all over them, so look for some breakout potential at SXSW.  The band aims for sugary melodies with a soft rock edge, but there’s tenderness to their songwriting and vocals that warrants a mention.
Wet Nuns (5) – Musically, I’m really digging on Wet Nuns’ heavy, pounding blues-rock riffs.  Their vocalist knowingly screams through his lyrics, which surprisingly doesn’t really mesh well with the loose grooves of the band.
White Violet (5) - Athens, Georgia indie rock band White Violet sounds like a gritty, dark version of Wilco on their latest record Hiding, Mingling.  Most of the tracks hit at most a mid-tempo beat, creating a sadness that resides over the whole album.

SXSW 2013 Spreadsheet 56:


Both new acts and returning OEB favorites make up this latest set, with eight bands scoring a “5” or above.  Highlights:


The Whigs (10) - Songs like “Gospel” and “Waiting” exhibit a tied-in rhythm section that is often overlooked with bands focusing on instrumental dynamics so much these last couple of years.

Wildcat! Wildcat! (9) - This isn’t quite radio-friendly material, rather Wildcat! Wildcat! focuses on inventive melodies and diversions with an experimental eye towards songwriting.

Whitehorse (8) - The vocal back-and-forth they display on tracks like “Mismatched Eyes” and “Achilles’ Desire” is enchanting, an interplay that continues musically throughout the bluesy record.

Wild Child (8) - On the opposite side, Wild Child has a, well, wild side to them.  “The Tale of You & Me” builds into a rambunctious sing-a-long, like Edward Sharpe for a woodsier crowd.

Wheeler Brothers (6) – Austin’s Wheeler Brothers are a passionate outfit, which is displayed through raucous acoustic strums and soul-searching vocals on their 2011 LP.  Their strongest track is the laid back “Portraits”, which sounds to be an updated take on “Friend of the Devil”.

The Wellspring (5) – Indie folk pop duo The Wellspring have ‘mainstream’ written all over them, so look for some breakout potential at SXSW.  The band aims for sugary melodies with a soft rock edge, but there’s tenderness to their songwriting and vocals that warrants a mention.

Wet Nuns (5) – Musically, I’m really digging on Wet Nuns’ heavy, pounding blues-rock riffs.  Their vocalist knowingly screams through his lyrics, which surprisingly doesn’t really mesh well with the loose grooves of the band.

White Violet (5) - Athens, Georgia indie rock band White Violet sounds like a gritty, dark version of Wilco on their latest record Hiding, Mingling.  Most of the tracks hit at most a mid-tempo beat, creating a sadness that resides over the whole album.

Wild Child – “The Tale of You & Me”

 

Wild Child is a young indie folk outfit from Austin with a surprisingly strong sound with only one album under their belts.  There are two distinct sides to this band.  On one hand, Wild Child has a tender quality, best displayed on the sentimental title track.  Vocalists Kelsey Wilson and Alexander Beggins display some beautiful trade-offs and harmonies throughout the track, reminiscent of The Head and the Heart’s slower material.  On the opposite side, Wild Child has a, well, wild side to them.  “The Tale of You & Me” builds into a rambunctious sing-a-long, like Edward Sharpe for a woodsier crowd.  Wild Child should kill it on their home turf, so check them out at Beale Street Tavern on Tuesday with OEB highlights Ruby Jane and Kopecky Family Band.

SXSW 2012 Spreadsheet 116:

An incredibly solid set for this late in the game anchors our morning coverage.  Highlights:

Wild Child (8): On the opposite side, Wild Child has a, well, wild side to them.  “The Tale of You & Me” builds into a rambunctious sing-a-long, like Edward Sharpe for a woodsier crowd.
William Elliott Whitmore (8): Like a minimal folk version of Bruce Springsteen, there’s a distinctive growl in Whitmore’s voice that carries a strong emotional weight, like he’s about to crack purely from heartbreak at any moment.
Willy Mason (7): His baritone vocals lines carry a weight of sadness, using traditional country and blues music as a backbone for Mason’s free wheeling stories.
White Violet (6): White Violet is the moniker of Nate Nelson, an Athens, GA native with a folk-based indie rock sounds, kind of sounds like a young Bright Eyes (that’s a good thing). 
The Wild Feathers (6): Falling somewhere between The Black Keys and The Black Crowes, The Wild Feathers have a jamming, gritty blues rock vibe.
Wild Moccasins (6): Though they bring an experimental twist, Wild Moccasins achieve a pretty big sound with dramatic pop and impassioned guy/girl vocals.
WIM (6): Like Midlake mixed with a little In Rainbows-era Radiohead, Australian band WIM has a flair for the dark and dramatic, but use a hypnotic mid-tempo pace instead of a traditional, driving rock approach.
Winterpills (6): With sweeping strings and dramatic percussion, Winterpills is right up the alley for anyone seeking chamber folk pop at SXSW.  Instead of building into dramatic anthems, Winterpills has a soft touch with their elegant and dense acoustic sound.
Widowspeak (5): Widowspeak is a dark rock band, combining slow and grungy alternative rock with a bluesy, alt country slant.
The Wilderness of Manitoba (5): Big harmonies and cutesy indie folk define The Wilderness of Manitoba, like a pop-oriented Fleet Foxes.
Will Sexton (5): Sexton is an Austin singer-songwriter featuring a nice storytelling approach to his accessible and light alt country sound.
Wintersleep (5): I’m not sure if there is such a thing as upbeat shoegaze, but Wintersleep fits that bill with their dreamy, psych pop sound.

SXSW 2012 Spreadsheet 116:


An incredibly solid set for this late in the game anchors our morning coverage.  Highlights:


Wild Child (8): On the opposite side, Wild Child has a, well, wild side to them.  “The Tale of You & Me” builds into a rambunctious sing-a-long, like Edward Sharpe for a woodsier crowd.

William Elliott Whitmore (8): Like a minimal folk version of Bruce Springsteen, there’s a distinctive growl in Whitmore’s voice that carries a strong emotional weight, like he’s about to crack purely from heartbreak at any moment.

Willy Mason (7): His baritone vocals lines carry a weight of sadness, using traditional country and blues music as a backbone for Mason’s free wheeling stories.

White Violet (6): White Violet is the moniker of Nate Nelson, an Athens, GA native with a folk-based indie rock sounds, kind of sounds like a young Bright Eyes (that’s a good thing). 

The Wild Feathers (6): Falling somewhere between The Black Keys and The Black Crowes, The Wild Feathers have a jamming, gritty blues rock vibe.

Wild Moccasins (6): Though they bring an experimental twist, Wild Moccasins achieve a pretty big sound with dramatic pop and impassioned guy/girl vocals.

WIM (6): Like Midlake mixed with a little In Rainbows-era Radiohead, Australian band WIM has a flair for the dark and dramatic, but use a hypnotic mid-tempo pace instead of a traditional, driving rock approach.

Winterpills (6): With sweeping strings and dramatic percussion, Winterpills is right up the alley for anyone seeking chamber folk pop at SXSW.  Instead of building into dramatic anthems, Winterpills has a soft touch with their elegant and dense acoustic sound.

Widowspeak (5): Widowspeak is a dark rock band, combining slow and grungy alternative rock with a bluesy, alt country slant.

The Wilderness of Manitoba (5): Big harmonies and cutesy indie folk define The Wilderness of Manitoba, like a pop-oriented Fleet Foxes.

Will Sexton (5): Sexton is an Austin singer-songwriter featuring a nice storytelling approach to his accessible and light alt country sound.

Wintersleep (5): I’m not sure if there is such a thing as upbeat shoegaze, but Wintersleep fits that bill with their dreamy, psych pop sound.